“I am Greta”: an inside look at young climate activist Greta Thunberg

Galilea Velasco, Section Editor

Scientists have worked hard for the past year to stop the spread of COVID-19, and now it was recently announced that we can accept a vaccine by 2021. How is it then, after decades of warnings, there is still global warming to worry about? 

Released on Oct. 23 the 97 minute documentary, available on Hulu, I am Greta, Greta Thunberg leaves viewers with their mouth wide open through her determination to do something to stop the effects of global warming. 

Without a doubt, this documentary leaves viewers speechless as Thunberg sets the bar high for everyone from young to older ones.  She serves as an example proving that age does not limit what you can do as she has been nominated for the 2020 Nobel Peace Prize at the age of 17. 

Why should I give up when there were so many different things you could do to make a difference?”

— Greta Thunberg

The four out of five star documentary, that took almost two years to film, contains beautiful cinematography and a filming style that leaves you feeling as if you were truly walking shoulder to shoulder with Thunberg, as she brings to light more and more the problem of generations, that problem being climate change.

“I am on a school strike for the climate in front of the Parliament,” Thunberg said at just 15 years old. 

The film follows Thunberg with Asperger’s and continues as she gains popularity as a climate activist. The film shares the admiration of many such as actor and Governor of California Arnold Scwazenegger, and even the Pope. 

“I love seeing someone who doesn’t just complain, but gets out and does something about it. You [Thunberg] inspire me,” Schwazenegger said. 

Thunberg, on the sentiment of doing rather than saying, has taken matters into her own hands after being exposed to the emergent reality of climate change. 

“We saw a film in school. There were starving polar bears, floods, hurricanes and droughts. And the scientists said we don’t have much time to change our behavior. That was when I started getting depressed, and anxiety, and stopped eating and stopped talking,”  Thunberg said. 

She tells the story of almost losing hope but then she came to a life changing realization. 

“Why should I give up when there were so many different things you could do to make a difference?”

Thunberg has made this quote her battle cry and has tried to inform others so they can also maintain hope. As she does this she pushes through peoples critics and makes sure to bring attention to this serious problem, doing all that she can. 

I love seeing someone who doesn’t just complain, but gets out and does something about it. You [Thunberg] inspire me,”

— Arnold Schwarzenegger

Environmental science teacher and club director, Michael Yorke shares his opinion about Thunberg and even agrees on what we all can do to help future generations and our home. 

“I think she is standing up for what she believes in” and “I think she has received some unfair criticism,” Yorke said referring to the disapproval Thunberg has received from bluntly exposing what some perceive to be misplaced priorities of politicians. 

Despite some criticism, people have praised Thunberg.

“Greta will be a role model to many young people, including kids with Aspergers or autism spectrum disorder, shy or “different” kids who’ve struggled to fit in, and those especially concerned about the urgent problem of climate change… Young people can make a difference,” Common Sense Media said.